Grant K. Gibson has been designing homes for more than 15 years. Originally from Los Angeles, the 39-year-old designer, who’s now based in San Francisco, takes pride in creating living spaces that speak to the personality, preferences and experiences of his clients. Now, he’s releasing his first book, The Curated Home, which takes readers inside his design process and educates them on how to develop a timeless and curated interior that’ll fulfill their aesthetic tastes for years to come. “It’s not only about practical tips — how to display objects from travels, what to look for when making furniture purchases and the type of paints that work best in a particular room — but also how to think like an interior designer,” Gibson writes in the book’s introduction.
I like that you talked about how you must consider having a little extra for the budget in bathroom remodeling because there can be unexpected problems that can affect the cost of the project. My husband and I are interested to remodel our bathroom to give it a newer look. We’ve been talking about the factors that we should consider in setting a budget for it since we want everything planned accordingly. With that being said, I’ll make sure to consider having a little extra for the budget. Thanks!
Sure, your eyes may want the most modern, chic couch in the showroom. But your back may not. "In my experience, it's really better to test out seating and take the time to look at the dimensions," says Sharon Blaustein. If you're tall, for instance, you might want to opt for a depth of between 40 to 42 inches for a sofa (rather than the standard depth of 36 inches).
Take note of design inspirations in every facet of life. I often use these as a starting point to discuss with clients when I’m hired to help them design the interiors of their homes. Recall a hotel in which you’ve stayed or restaurant in which you’ve dined that particularly struck your fancy. Perhaps it was a minimal interior from your trip to Japan or a clubby bar in New York furnished with worn leather chairs.
Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.

If you’re an experienced DIYer, you are likely good at working around the disruptions of a house remodel. However, if you’ve hired a contractor for any part of the job, be sure to be clear about your daily routine, and work with the contractor to come up with start and end times that cause the least disruption in your family’s day. After all, no one wants to encounter tradespeople while you’re still in your bathrobe.

Until a few decades ago, all bathrooms were small—most were no larger than 5 feet by 8 feet, providing just enough room for a tub/shower combination, vanity, and toilet. You might think that the smaller the bathroom, the more challenging the remodeling, because how can you create openness and space without tearing out any existing walls? Luckily, homeowners who plan to work with what they’ve got may find that smart choices in colors, fixtures, and amenities can make a small bathroom look and feel larger than its actual square footage. We asked Joe Maykut, a product manager for Sears Home Services, to share with us the design tactics that work best for homeowners stuck with small bathrooms—and boy, did he deliver. If you’re itching to remodel your bathroom, the following eight tips will help you make the most of your small space.
Before starting all the mess of a remodel, it’s a good plan to designate a renovation-free zone for your family to gather in semi-relaxation. Make sure you have everything you need in one place, such as a kettle or microwave, so you have one functional space to gather, eat or just unwind at the end of the day. For more relaxation ideas, check out our 8 Projects for Backyard Fun.

For home owners who are currently in the process of building a new home, what they can do is incorporate a remote timer and this would give them the ability of being able to turn the fan on in the middle of the day or at night remotely. Likewise, you can also consider wiring in a dehumidistat, so that the fan would be able to run whenever you need it.
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