It really helped when you said that getting an efficient lighting design can help eliminate shadows on faces. That was a common problem we have in our bathroom before. It was too dark and my husband easily gets cuts when shaving. With this bathroom improvement project, I’d be sure to get help from a professional so we can remedy this lighting issue. Thanks for the very helpful tip!

Having  a floor heating system that can be laid under the tile in the shower is a nice add-on, not only is it more comfortable ambiant air temperature, but the feel of warmth on normally cold tile in the morning is a nice change that you will certainly enjoy.  It’s important to ensure that the heating system you’re going to get can be used inside the shower. For those who are interested in this type of bathroom, it is ideal to consult a professional who would help you plan the layout.


Do-it-yourselfers can reap big savings with recycled or lightly used fixtures and building materials. Habitat for Humanity operates about 400 ReStores nationwide, which offer salvaged materials at half off home-center prices. One caveat: Many contractors won't work with salvaged items, or homeowner-supplied materials in general, because they don't want to assume the liability if something goes wrong. That said, if you're doing your own work, you can find anything from prehung doors to acrylic skylights to partial bundles of insulation. (To find a ReStore near you, visit habitat.org.)
Busting the budget is everyone's biggest fear when it comes to renovation. And with good reason. Even if you follow the essential advice we've been doling out for years—build in a 20 percent cushion to cover the nasty surprises, get contractor references and check them, banish the words "while you're at it" from your vocabulary—it's hard not to end up shelling out more than you want to, even if you want to pen a check for a million bucks.
Most en suite bathrooms are attached to the master bedroom, but there may be exceptions depending on the layout of your home. They are meant to be more private spaces than guest bathrooms, allowing you to put a more intimate or creative touch to this space. They are convenient due to their proximity to the bedroom, helping you maintain a comfortable amount of privacy.  Dating back to the 1960s, en suite bathrooms have become commonplace in the modern home. You can add simple or elegant upgrades to your en suite bathroom to make it a distinct selling feature. If you don’t currently have an en suite, you can add one by converting a large closet or building onto the bedroom.

By sticking to the lightest shades within a single color family for paint and furniture, you’ll avoid the strong contrasting hues that can make a small room seem even smaller. Matching your choice of floor tile to the wall color can also be a good idea—this will make the corners of the room disappear, creating a feeling of more space. Avoid putting any color on the ceiling, though; a basic white is the best choice here.
Choosing the right layout for your powder room is important, not just for you but for your guests. This is the bathroom that your friends and neighbors will use most often in your home, rather than traveling to the private bathroom next to your bedroom.Powder rooms got their name from the 18th century, and are still largely used for the same purpose: as a space for guests to freshen up. Nowadays, powder rooms typically include a toilet and a sink, but never a tub or a shower. If you are looking to build a custom powder room from scratch, you should make space near your entryway or off of one of the more public rooms in your home.Typical powder rooms are about 20 square feet in size, and can be an easy extension to a living room or hallway. Pedestal sinks are a great way to save space when your powder room is on the smaller side, leaving plenty of legroom for guests. There are certain measurements and specifications that must be utilized in accordance with the IRC. The toilet and sink must always be accessible. But in most cases, this is easy to accomplish for your bathroom remodeling.
Any good contractor will have no problem providing references, and copies of liability insurance before a job begins. Don’t rely solely on client testimonials, search out actual customers that can give you a firsthand account and answer any questions you may have. For any project, ask to see before and after images of a contractor’s prior work, and most importantly—trust your gut and know which questions to ask.

"Most clients don't want to hear those words," says Paul Irwin, design director with Landis Construction, in the Washington, D.C., area, "but it really needs to be considered on major remodels."In one case, for example, plans for a 1,300-square-foot addition revealed that the house's existing foundation wasn't up to code and would have to be replaced—a $30,000 proposition. After crunching the numbers, the owners concluded that it would cost as much to update the house, a former summer cottage, as it would to reproduce it new. "For a relatively small additional cost," says the owner, "we get all the benefits of new construction while preserving the character and feel of our old house."


Having  a floor heating system that can be laid under the tile in the shower is a nice add-on, not only is it more comfortable ambiant air temperature, but the feel of warmth on normally cold tile in the morning is a nice change that you will certainly enjoy.  It’s important to ensure that the heating system you’re going to get can be used inside the shower. For those who are interested in this type of bathroom, it is ideal to consult a professional who would help you plan the layout.
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